Vacancy: Buck Island Sea Turtle Research Program Research Assistant, USVI

Biodiversity

Buck Island Reef, a US National Monument in the Virgin Islands, is inviting applications for the internship position of Sea Turtle Research Assistant:

Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM), located on the island of St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, is seeking applicants for the position of Sea Turtle Research Assistant (intern) to conduct sea turtle research and monitoring. This will be the 31st year of the Buck Island Sea Turtle Research Program (BISTRP), a long-term monitoring, research, and conservation project supported by the National Park Service (NPS), Buck Island Reef National Monument. BIRNM is a nesting beach for hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), green (Chelonia mydas), leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea), and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtles.

This project will be begin in mid-July and extend for 12 weeks into early October 2018 (applicants must state availability in their cover letter). If selected, interns are expected to stay the length of the project. This is a highly competitive project that is physically and mentally intense, aimed at individuals who want to make ecology/resource management their career.

Find out more about the position, the qualifications required, and how to apply in the full vacancy announcement [pdf]. The application deadline is March 2, 2018.

 

[Image credit: Becky A. Dayhuff, via US NOAA]

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