Trinidad and Tobago turtle conservationist receives Commonwealth Point of Light award

Len Peters, turtle conservationist. Image via Points of Light
Biodiversity

Turtle conservationist Len Peters is the recipient of the first Commonwealth Points of Light award, in honour of his exceptional voluntary service protecting endangered turtle species:

Len Peters, representing Trinidad and Tobago, is a turtle conservationist and chairman of the ‘Grande Riviere Nature Tour Guide Association’ who protects 20,000 turtle nests every year.

Thanks to his educational work in local communities and regular patrols of the beaches, Trinidad and Tobago is now home to one of the densest leatherback nesting beaches in the world. Len’s work appeared on BBC’s ‘Blue Planet 2’ with Sir David Attenborough.

Len said:

“On behalf of the dedicated members of my organisation I am honoured to accept this Point of Light award. This award recognises many years of dedicated voluntary service by me and members of my community to protecting the environment and creating sustainable livelihoods. My acceptance of this award, on their behalf, will in some small way inspire others to see the value of voluntary service. I am truly honoured.”

The Commonwealth Points of Light Awards celebrate inspirational acts of volunteering, and encourage others to volunteer and make a positive impact in their community.

 

[Image via Points of Light]

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