Swedish company Seabased to bring wave energy to the Caribbean

Image: seabased.com
Energy

Seabased, a Swedish clean energy company that designs, builds and installs wave energy parks, has signed an agreeement to bring wave energy to the Caribbean:

Bermuda General Agency Ltd. (BGA Ltd.) of Hamilton, Bermuda, has signed an agreement with Seabased AB of Lysekil, Sweden, to purchase two 20 MW wave energy parks in the Caribbean. Seabased designs and installs offshore parks that convert ocean waves to electricity for the grid. Feasibility studies of the Caribbean project will begin on several islands this summer, and phase one is expected to be operational by the fall of 2019.

“We have long wrestled with limited energy supply and very high prices throughout the Caribbean,” said Wendall Brown, CEO and Chairman of BGA Ltd. “We have relied primarily on fossil fuels which damage our environment and threaten our childrens’ future. Recognizing the vast energy resource represented in the waves that roll onto our beaches every day, I have researched every opportunity to harness this energy. Seabased’s Ocean Wave Energy Solution is not only the most efficient in the market, but it is also the most sustainable and economical.”

Phase one of the first 20 MW is a 5 MW pilot in the Bahamas. Brown says many islands are competing to be among the first to have wave parks. According to the agreement, Seabased will design, manufacture, install and manage the maintenance of the wave parks.

“BGA and its leadership are very forward-thinking and committed to protecting the environment of the Caribbean,” said Seabased CEO Øivind Magnussen. “We believe that Seabased’s technology, which has been developed over two decades, with 100+ unique patents, is a perfect option for islands like those in the Caribbean with desirable wave climates and a high need for energy. Yet it takes people with vision to help really bring wave energy into its proper place among renewables – BGA and its supporter, the Bank of Butterfield & Son, have that vision.”

The permitting process has already begun in several Caribbean jurisdictions, making the Caribbean islands pioneers in bringing wave energy forward.

For more information, visit the Seabased website.

 

[Image: seabased.com]
No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Nature Foundation staff tags a shark in St. Maarten's waters. Image: St. Maarten Nature Foundation.
Biodiversity
St. Maarten Nature Foundation relaunches shark conservation project

The St. Maarten Nature Foundation has relaunched its shark research and conservation project, which was put on hold in 2017 as a result of Hurricanes Irma and Maria: Nature Foundation has restarted its shark conservation programme as part of the Dutch Caribbean Nature Alliance (DCNA) “Save Our Sharks” conservation project …

Saint Lucia solar installation. Image: Rocky Mountain Institute via New Energy Events
Energy
Five renewable energy projects to watch in the Caribbean

New Energy Events highlights five Caribbean renewable energy projects they’re keeping an eye on. They are: Paradise Park, 37 MW Solar PV, Jamaica Developer: Eight Rivers Energy Company The largest solar plant in the Caribbean is exected to come online in mid-2018. At the time of signing, the 8.54 US …

Coral reef, Cuba. Image: rparsons86
Biodiversity
How low-input agriculture helps Cuba’s coral reefs stay healthy

The key takeaway from this bioGraphic article is “Every decision you make on land affects the ocean as well.” Especially for islands: [W]hen the Soviet bloc fell in the early 90s, it abruptly turned off the spigot for Cuba’s sugar subsidies and regular shipments of food, gasoline, farming equipment, synthetic fertilizers, …