St. Vincent and the Grenadines suspends importation of glyphosate pesticides

Roundup. Image: Mike Mozart
Agriculture

Following the outcome of the civil lawsuit against agribusiness company Monsanto, in which the plaintiff successfully argued that the company’s weed-killing product Roundup was responsible for his terminal cancer, the government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines has put a suspension on the importation of Roundup and other glyphosate-containing pesticides:

The Government of St Vincent and the Grenadines has placed an immediate suspension on the importation of pesticides that contain the acting ingredient glyphosate.

Acting on the advice of the Pesticides Board, the government said the chemical is found in pesticides such as Round-Up, Touchdown, and Glyphos.

According to a statement on Friday, the move is pending a technical review by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries, Rural Transformation, Industry, and Labour.

“A preliminary review was conducted by the Pesticides Board which revealed that further research is needed regarding these listed chemicals. In the interim, a special technical committee was established to advise on sustainable alternatives to the listed chemicals. This committee is expected to present its findings by October 1,” the statement noted.

Meanwhile, the Caribbean Agriculture Research and Development Institute, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture have been requested to provide support to the Ministry of Agriculture to conduct a full chemical analysis of the products.

The Ministry is also scheduled to launch a national sensitisation programme with stakeholders within the sector. 

“The Department of Labour takes this opportunity to remind farmers and farm workers of the duty of care needed while using chemicals. Employers must provide protective gears and a safe working environment for employees in accordance with the Laws of St. Vincent and the Grenadines,” the statement added.

Source: the Jamaica Gleaner.

[Image: Mike Mozart]

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