Science without Borders Challenge 2018 – international student art contest

Science without Borders® Challenge 2018
Oceans

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation — Science without Borders® Challenge is an international art contest open to students between the ages of 11 and 19. Each year, the contest focuses on the need for protection and restoration of the world’s marine and aquatic ecosystems.

This year’s competition celebrates International Year of the Reef 2018, with the theme Why Coral Reefs Matter:

The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation is excited to announce that this year’s Science Without Borders® Challenge is in conjunction with International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) to celebrate the International Year of the Reef (IYOR). IYOR is a global effort to increase awareness and understanding on the values and threats to coral reefs, and to support related conservation, research, and management efforts. All around the world, nations, organizations, schools, and individuals will observe and take part in IYOR 2018 in a variety of ways. As an artist, you can too.

In celebration of IYOR, this year’s Science Without Borders® Challenge takes the importance of coral reefs as its theme. Harness your artistic skills and creative vision to create a piece of art that illustrates “Why Coral Reefs Matter.” Your artwork may portray why coral reefs matter to you, your country, the world, and/or other organisms or ecosystems.

Participating means you will be an active supporter of IYOR 2018: not only will your artwork aid in creating awareness about the importance of coral reefs, it will also be displayed at various IYOR events around the world. Which, of course, makes this year’s contest an extra special one. So, get inspired. Take part in this great global initiative by applying your talents. And help make a difference!

Visit the Living Oceans Foundation website to find out more about this year’s challenge, including contest rules and how to enter. The deadline for entries is April 23, 2018.

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