Event: First Latin America and Caribbean Congress for Conservation Biology

Latin America and Caribbean Congress for Conservation Biology
Biodiversity
2

The inaugural Latin America and Caribbean Congress for Conservation Biology will be held in Trinidad and Tobago, July 25 to 27, 2018:

The Latin America and Caribbean Section (LACA) of the Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) is proud to join the University of the West Indies to host the inaugural Latin America and Caribbean Congress for Conservation Biology (LACCCB 2018) in Trinidad and Tobago.

SCB is the world’s largest community of conservation professionals dedicated to the science and practice of conserving Earth’s biological diversity. The meeting will bring together communities of conservation professionals to address conservation challenges and present new findings, initiatives, methods, tools and opportunities for collaboration in conservation science and practice. Scientists, students, managers, decision-makers, writers, and other conservation professionals are invited to participate in this event.

For more information about the extremely rich programme of activities, which includes workshops, symposia, poster sessions, and plenary talks by three distinguished speakers (Dr. Diva Amon, Dr. Howard Nelson, and Professor Gerardo Ceballos), see the Congress website, Facebook page and Twitter feed.

Pingback: Green Antilles
Pingback: Green Antilles
2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Shark, the Bahamas. Image: Mark Yokoyama
Biodiversity
Beneath the Waves and shark conservation in The Bahamas

Marine biologist Melissa Cristina Márquez writes about shark conservation organisation Beneath the Waves and the research they are doing in The Bahamas. According to Dr. Austin Gallagher, the organisation’s Chief Scientist, “There are few places worldwide that are as important to sharks than the Bahamas.” In 2018, Beneath the Waves launched one …

Shield bug, Puerto Rico. Image: S Crews
Biodiversity
The disappearance of insects from Puerto Rico’s rainforests is a “hyper-alarming” sign

The UK Guardian reports on the collapse of insect populations in Puerto Rico’s Luquillo rainforest. Plummeting insect populations, in Puerto Rico and other parts of the world, have been attributed to climate change, and could have effects that ripple through entire ecosystems and food webs: “We knew that something was …

Green Turtle, Cayman Islands. Image: Pete.
Biodiversity
Green turtles have made a comeback in the Cayman Islands due to reintroduction programmes

Science Daily reports on the success of a programme to reintroduce the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) to the Cayman Islands: During the eighties, overexploitation of the green turtle in the Cayman Islands caused the disappearance of nesting populations. To recover this endangered population, a program of reintroduction of the species …