Bonaire brands itself the world’s first “Blue Destination”

Bonaire. Image: Falco Ermert
Oceans

The island of Bonaire is positioning itself as the first “Blue Destination” in the Caribbean and the world. From Tourism Bonaire:

In celebration of World Ocean Day, Bonaire proudly announces the development of a multifaceted public private partnership program that will officially establish Bonaire as the first Blue Destination. In committing to and adapting the sustainable use of ocean resources for growth, well-being, jobs and the ocean ecosystem’s health, Bonaire will be the World’s First Blue Destination. Bonaire will position itself as a progressive island in terms of synergizing people and nature. This will increase Bonaire’s competitive position and secure its position as a leader in the preservation of its assets.

Bonaire has always been a worldwide leader in recognizing the important aspects and developments of sustainability as well as sustainable economic growth opportunities. Bonaire was the first Caribbean island to have a protected marine park, with protection of nature as a cornerstone of our sustainable tourism policies; the island’s economic development plan is built on sustainability and 40% of the island uses clean energy. Bonaire’s recognition of the importance of its water resources even extends to its flag, where the blue represents the pure waters. Becoming a Blue Destination is aligned with Bonaire’s culture, history and the heritage of people who have embraced and protected the ocean for their livelihood. Bonaire looks forward to adapt the Blue concept and share this with its stakeholders, community and visitors.

Find out more at the Tourism Bonaire website and at BlueDestination.com.

 

 

[Image: via Falco Ermery]

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