Bermuda hotel launches marine conservation awareness website

Diving for Bermuda. Image credit: Hamilton Princess Hotel
Biodiversity

The Hamilton Princess Hotel in Bermuda has launched a new website to raise awareness about the island’s marine life and the need to preserve it. Dive Photo Guide reports:

The Hamilton Princess hotel’s conservation campaign is built around an informative website that shares interesting facts about the various marine species that can be seen while diving in Bermuda. As well, it informs viewers that some of these species – such as the ecologically prized parrotfish – have become threatened or endangered in recent years.

“We created this online experience to show a glimpse of what it is like to dive in Bermuda while spreading awareness around the vulnerability of some of our most beautiful marine species,” said Diarmaid O’Sullivan, the Director of Marketing at The Hamilton Princess.

Check out the informational website, here.

[Image credit: Hamilton Princess Hotel]

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