Atlantis Resort in The Bahamas supports manta ray research and conservation

Courtesy Atlantis, Paradise Island (PRNewsfoto/Atlantis, Paradise Island)
Biodiversity

Did you know that the Atlantis Paradise Island Resort in The Bahamas is a significant hub for manta ray research and conservation?

[Earlier this month] at Atlantis, Paradise Island resort in The Bahamas, one of only two aquariums in the Western Hemisphere to presently care for and study the manta ray, a marine scientist and a team of 20 marine aquarists successfully completed the transfer of a 700+ pound manta nicknamed “Leyley” with a 11.4-foot wingspan from the resort’s 2.7-million gallon marine habitat back into the Atlantic Ocean, as part of their renowned release and research program.

Leyley’s transfer marks the 13th manta ray release for the resort, whose marine husbandry practices and research have contributed greatly to data collection of the species.

As part of its multi-year research efforts in tagging manta rays, Mote will track Leyley’s journey and the depths and temperatures she encounters, to help understand the migratory behavior and survival of released mantas. This data will be valuable not only to Atlantis in their care for mantas, but to many aquariums, marine researchers and educators, as they work in tandem to learn more about this one-of-a-kind, mysterious giant of the marine world.

Atlantis guests are able to go behind the scenes with the Marine Team to better understand how the team of over 165 marine experts care for, rescue and rehabilitate, and contribute to research for about 250 species of marine animals. They are also able to participate in the “Snorkel the Ruins” program, which allows guests to come face-to-face with over 20,000 marine animals.

A portion of the cost of Atlantis’ marine interactive programs goes back to the Atlantis Blue Project Foundation (ABPF), the resort’s nonprofit, 501(c)3 organization dedicated to saving sea species and their extraordinary habitats throughout The Bahamas and surrounding Caribbean seas.

Source: PR News Wire.

 

[Image: Atlantis Paradise Island via PR News Wire]

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