Operation Wallacea (OpWall) is:

an organisation funded by tuition fees that operates biological and conservation management research programmes in remote locations across the world. These expeditions are designed with specific wildlife conservation aims in mind – from identifying areas needing protection through to implementing and assessing conservation management programmes.

The videos above highlight OpWall’s work in the Caribbean region, in Cuba and Guyana. In Cuba, OpWall has partnered with the Centre for Marine Research at the University of Havana, and in Guyana with the Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development. As the OpWall website explains:

In each country a long-term agreement is signed with a partner organisation and, over the course of this agreement, it is hoped to achieve a survey and management development programme at each of the sites.

Find out more at opwall.com.

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One Response to “Operation Wallacea in the Caribbean: conservation research in Cuba and Guyana” Subscribe

  1. Nathan November 13, 2011 at 8:18 pm #

    Loved every minute of it :)

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