Tillandsia recurvata [A December 2010 update to this post, providing information on the prostate cancer drug derived from the Jamaican Ball Moss plant can be found here.]

From the Jamaica Gleaner:

Renowned Jamaican scientist, Professor Henry Lowe, whose research led to the discovery of a new cancer drug treatment, has been invited to make a special presentation at the Eighth Annual Congress of International Drug Discovery Science and Technology (IDDST) next month in Beijing, China.

Lowe’s presentation will be on research work on Jamaican medicinal plants, particularly his recent work with Tillandsia recurvata, otherwise called ball moss, which has demonstrated potent anti-cancer activities during testing.

The IDDST Congress, which is being held October 23-25, is considered to be a leading international event that highlights scientific and technological breakthroughs, and will focus on bringing the next blockbuster drug to market.

Read the complete article at the Gleaner.

For more on Dr. Lowe and his research on Tillandsia recurvata, see this Gleaner article from a couple of years back and this patent for “a pharmacologically active compound extracted from the indigenous Jamaican plant Ball Moss … that has beneficial activity principally in destroying cancer cells”.

[Photo: mickl pickl]

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One Response to “cancer and hiv drugs from jamaican ball moss” Subscribe

  1. amillia January 28, 2011 at 5:29 pm #

    base on the fact, “no weh no betta dan yawd”, i will be able to wear logo on my blouse stating that i am proud to be jamaican, then find my way back home. way to go dr. lowe. that’s how GOD works. using the base things of the world to confound the wise and prudent. lets all say a prayer for him.

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