View of the East Coast of BarbadosThe village of Consett Bay, Barbados, is being hailed as a model of environmental sustainability on the island:

Consett Bay has been hailed as a model of successful integration of economic advancement and environmental prudence.

And its example is one that other communities island wide are being urged to emulate.

The kudos for the quaint fishing community came this morning from Minister of the Environment. Dr. Denis Lowe, as he addressed the official opening of the Consett Bay Sustainable Fishing Educational Exposition organised by the Ministry of the Environment, in collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture and other stakeholders.

“Consett Bay is an ideal case study in demonstrating to the island, as a whole, that we can indeed make this successful transition.

“It is our wish that other communities across our island seek to emulate this level of enterprise and entrepreneurship, while being mindful of the delicate balance that must be maintained between socio-economic advancement and environmental sustainability,” he emphasised.

Dr. Lowe noted Consett Bay had managed to strike that delicate balance and evolve into a community mindful that economic development could not be separated from community ties, a rich tradition and a wholesome lifestyle.

The Minister opined: “In our nation’s quest for achieving sustainable development, it is strongly believed that Barbadian communities can adopt the Consett Bay model and ensure that their activities are rooted in this particular paradigm.”

Minister Lowe also emphasised the importance of the fishing industry to the economy, culture and society of Barbados, and called for the establishment of a national park extending from Archer’s Bay, St. Lucy to Consett Bay, St. John:

“The proposed national park will seek to ensure that developmental activities in the environmentally sensitive Scotland District utilise sustainable land management approaches while at the same time ensuring that the residents enjoy a high quality of life. Accordingly, communities will be encouraged to boost their livelihoods in a way that is not detrimental to the local ecology through the employment of a number of policy measures”, he stated.

Read more from the Barbados Government Information Service, the Nation Newspaper and the Barbados Advocate.

[Photo: Joe Ross]

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